Friday, August 29, 2008

The Un-Sure Thing

Barack Obama's historic acceptance of the Democratic nomination to be president fell under its own weight last night.

When you're making real history, it's difficult to live up to it with mere words and promises.

The forum created for Obama actually looked like THE forum. With it's giant columns, it resembled a Roman temple from which an oracle would reveal his vision of the future.

But in the end, it was the same old same old: More money for teachers. More jobs. No outsourcing. Affordable college. Better healthcare. Lower taxes for the "middleclass." And, of course, "We" are patriots too.

Obama accused his Republican opponent of being out of touch, clueless and wrong. Fair enough. But for a candidate who promises to transcend the old politics, the old ways, all this stuff is as old as the seven hills of Rome.

Maybe the problem was the setting. No one, short of a real rock star, could have succeeded in that setting. That Obama could draw such a crowd (85,000 people) is amazing in itself. But did he deliver the rhetorical goods? Did he manage to connect with the voters he needs to win this election? Not last night.

He was out-performed by just about every other important speaker at the convention, from Hillary, to Bill, to Biden to Kennedy to his wife, Michele. Obama's speech was essentially the same one he's been giving for the last six months. There were no surprises. No memorable moments.

Last night was the 40th anniversary of Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech. In a very real way, Obama's mere presence on that stage, is King's dream (and ours) coming true. A man of African-American heritage being nominated and having a real shot to become the next president of the United States.

Now, he has to win it based on the content of, not only his character, but his ideas, judgment, record and experience. It is in these areas that Barack Obama becomes a tough sell.

His ideas and voting record, skimpy as it is, reveal not only a liberal but a very liberal politician. His judgment will continue to be questioned on matters large (the war and the surge) and small (his past associations with a radical black preacher and white domestic terrorist from the 1960s) until Election Day. His experience when it comes to governing or running anything is slighter than slight. It is virtually non-existent.

In an election year where the Democrats have every advantage, they nominated a candidate who can be easily (and accurately) portrayed as too young, too raw, and too liberal for many Americans to vote for.

Every candidate has their flaws. Hillary had plenty. So does John McCain. But the voters, at least, know them. Obama remains a cypher, a hollow man. He can talk the talk but is there any there there?

As a basketball player, Obama likes to stay on the perimeter and shoot 3-pointers with nobody guarding him. That doesn't win presidential elections. To win the Oval Office you've got to be able to take it hoop; to take contact and score in traffic.

The Dems nominating Obama is like an NBA team drafting an 8th grader. He could be a great one but it's way to early to tell.

10 Comments:

Blogger David Diano said...

This comment has been removed by the author.

August 29, 2008 at 10:50 AM 
Anonymous randal said...

In a very real way, Obama's mere presence on that stage, is King's dream coming true. A man of African-American heritage being nominated and having a real shot to become the next president of the United States.

Now, he has to win it based on the content of, not only his character, but his ideas, judgment, record and experience. It is in these areas that Barack Obama becomes a tough sell.


This is why Obama is unquestionably just the Affirmative Action Candidate. And AA never results in the best candidate getting the possition. Certainly the presidency is too important a job to play such hollow social engineering games.

August 29, 2008 at 11:12 AM 
Blogger David Diano said...

This comment has been removed by the author.

August 29, 2008 at 11:36 AM 
Blogger steve mcdonald said...

i don't know diano, I'll take two years of executive experience in one party over none in the other.

August 29, 2008 at 12:18 PM 
Blogger steve mcdonald said...

I really don't get it, she's had about as much experience as Barack Obama, the difference that she's been an executive and he hasn't.

Governor Palin's story is becoming more and more fascinating as I read about her, she's going to be something else to read about in these coming months!

August 29, 2008 at 3:05 PM 
Blogger David Diano said...

This comment has been removed by the author.

August 30, 2008 at 1:07 AM 
Blogger David Diano said...

This comment has been removed by the author.

August 31, 2008 at 6:15 PM 
Anonymous r said...

And yet Palin still has more executive experience than the entire Donkey ticket and is more qualified for the job than Obama to run the country.

September 1, 2008 at 11:57 AM 
Blogger David Diano said...

This comment has been removed by the author.

September 1, 2008 at 3:53 PM 
Anonymous r said...

Again with the used bumper stickers.

September 1, 2008 at 9:06 PM 

Post a Comment

Subscribe to Post Comments [Atom]

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home